Homemade Latin-Inspired Spice Blend

This Latin-Inspired Spice Blend is a great staple to have when you're craving bold flavors that are well balanced as in the following recipe.  Think of it as a "season-all" that you can use on anything from meats, seafood, tofu, pasta, eggs, soups, stir-fry, and so much more! Get creative!

This mix also works exceptionally well in marinades and brines!

Makes about 2 cups.

INGREDIENTS
1/4 C Ancho Chili Powder
1/4 C Chili Powder
3 T Garlic Powder
1 T Onion Powder
2 T Freshly Ground Black Pepper
1 T Mexican Oregano
1 1/2 T Cumin Seeds
1 T Cocoa Powder (Unsweetened)
2 T Paprika
1 1/2 T Smoked Paprika
2 t Coriander Seeds
1/4 C Cornstarch

T= tablespoon  |  t= teaspoon  |  C= cup
*You may substitute ground spices where applicable but I always recommend buying whole spice (seeds, etc) and throwing them in a spice grinder myself as needed for a more fresh, robust flavor.


BLEND IT

Throw all ingredients in a blender or food processor and pulverize into a fine, uniform powder. If using whole spices, you'll especially want to be sure and run the machine as long as needed to have a nice, consistent size grind. That's it! Store it in an air tight container, best if out of direct light and around room temperature to encourage longer shelf life.

How much you use is all up to your tastebuds,
dispense the same way you would any other flavoring spice mix!


EXTRA NOTES
* You can add 1/4 C salt into the mix (preferably pink Himalayan for its' beneficial nutrient and mineral content) but I prefer leaving it out in order to control salt content per dish. 
** Cornstarch is a thickening agent and won't change the taste/texture of the blend if you decide to skip on it. In a stir-fry, for example, it is what will help the seasoning stick to your ingredients once moisture is present. In a soup or sauce it will tighten up the consistency and help your finished product not seem too runny. As a coating on chicken breast or a fish fillet, it will help form a light barrier to help seal in some moisture.Important! Cornstarch "thickens" at the boiling point, but boil it too long and it will slowly lose that ability. For soups and sauces, no more than 5 minutes at boiling temperatures then lower and simmer until desired flavor is achieved.


No comments:

Post a Comment

Miss. Kristine © , All Rights Reserved. BLOG DESIGN BY Sadaf F K.